Nature Club News, September, 2018

NATURE CLUB NEWS September 2018

by John Dickson


The Owen Sound Field Naturalists Club is off to a busy start for the 2018-19 season.

On August 31st, OSFN members joined in with the Community Tagging Day hosted by the Butterfly Gardens of Saugeen Shores. OSFN Director Brian Robin reports that the monarchs were on hand in abundance for the event, and flying everywhere. “Over three dozen were tagged on the tagging day, and I understand BGOSS has tagged over 600 to date. More than 80 people turned out for tagging day, and we spoke to many passers-by about what we were doing and about monarchs in general. Many kids were able to tag and release a butterfly for their first time, so that’s always cool. In addition, one 5th instar monarch caterpillar was found at Perkins Park and a lone White Admiral, Limenitis arthemis arthemis, was flying around trying to look inconspicuous. There is another tagging day scheduled for Sept. 8, 10am-12noon.”

OSFN President Gord Toth was also on hand to witness and participate in this very engaged community activity and shared a few photos of the tagging process.

Tagged Monarch, ready to be released. (Photo by Gord Toth)

Tagged Monarch, ready to be released. (Photo by Gord Toth)


On Tuesday September 4th, popular hike leader Barbara Palmer invited club members to join her to check out the new facilities at Singing Sands and walk the shoreline trail, visiting a local Alvar to see what’s blooming.

She reported that “7 people were on hand, and we basically had the place to ourselves, which was quite something considering the heavy traffic SS has had this year. Species seen include Sneezeweed, Grass of Parnassus, Asters- purple stemmed, calico and flat topped, Goldenrods-Canada, bog and Ohio, Small fringed gentian, Small flowered agalinus, Nodding ladies tresses, Milkweed, Sweet white clover, Kalm’s lobelia, Ninebark, alder-leaves buckthorn.”

A few photos from Barbara showcase some of these beautiful plants.

Small-flowered gerardia (Photo by Barbara Palmer)

Small-flowered gerardia, Agalinus paupercula. (Photo by Barbara Palmer)

Small fringed gentian, Gentianopsis virgata. (Photo by Barbara Palmer)

Small fringed gentian, Gentianopsis virgata. (Photo by Barbara Palmer)


Later that same day, I received this message from Meaford resident Joe Buchanan –
“Yes, I was just watching the murmurations. About 5 years ago the starlings grouped over the same woodlot each evening for about ten days running. No guarantees but I’m hoping they will do the same this time as after their dance routine they are settling at sundown for the night in the same trees as before…last night and tonight the dance went on between 7.45 and 8.00pm The best place to view is from the large parking area along side the fire hall on Stewart Street. Small groups gradually approach from all directions and join up to form two or sometimes one giant dancing formation not unlike a “huge whale in the sky”. The sound of their wing rush is nerve tingling. Fingers crossed our starlings will return for at least a few more evenings. Joe”

I then forwarded this information to several keen birders and Wednesday evening I received this (edited) message from Peter Middleton

“Thank you Joe for this marvellous tip. We arrived this evening in Meaford to the sight of the birds in the midst of their remarkable display. I attach a couple of shots that I managed to take of them, even against the darkening background, just before a heavy rainfall began. It was a treat to see it. These miracles surround us at every moment, if only we have the eyes to see them. I am glad that you had the eyes to see them Joe.”

Starling Mumuration in Meaford. (Photo by Peter Middleton)

Starling Mumuration in Meaford. (Photo by Peter Middleton)

Starling Mumuration in Meaford. (Photo by Peter Middleton)

Starling Mumuration in Meaford. (Photo by Peter Middleton)

Starling Mumuration in Meaford. (Photo by Peter Middleton)

Starling Mumuration in Meaford. (Photo by Peter Middleton)


Due to the excessive heat on Wednesday, September 5th, the hike to a nature reserve property near Irish Lake, and hosted by Marg Gaviller was deferred to Thursday, September 6.


On September 5th Hayley Roberts, Plover Lovers Outreach and Education Coordinator shared a final report, indicating the successful fledging of two Piping Plover chicks, which did successfully fly away from Sauble Beach, and were identified on Chantry Island August 4th, as they worked their way south for the winter. Thanks again to all in the club and in the community who have helped with this vulnerable species, facing so many challenges for continued survival.


This Saturday, September 8, Jenna McGuire will lead an outing at the Lindsay Tract Trails, showcasing “the Métis perspective of our relatives with roots, medicinal, dye and fibre plants plus the indigenous perspective on plant ecology.”

Jenna McGuire (photo by Rob Gowan)

Jenna McGuire (photo by Rob Gowan)


NeighbourWoods North reported recently that “discussions are also taking place between NeighbourWoods North, Grey Bruce Health Services and the developers of the Bremont property on the east side of the hospital. Our hope is to transfer as many as 30 mature (20 foot) white spruce from there to the hospital grounds. If this does not happen, they will be destroyed. A variety of other ideas, suggested by members and by the City of Owen Sound, are also being considered. In order to keep up to date on NeighbourWoods North activities go to our website.” www.neighbourwoodsnorth.com.


The Young Naturalists club is gearing up to have another great season, getting started on September 23. Director Elaine van den Kieboom and her team have created a diverse and educational program of learning and fun, including hikes, birds and trees, snowshoes, and hot chocolate with bannock. For more details and to see the year at a glance poster, please visit http://owensoundfieldnaturalists.ca/category/young-naturalists/. There is plenty of room, but the first event is just a couple of weeks away. It has been a distinct pleasure to see the kids engage with the environment throughout the seasons. OSFN also gratefully acknowledges the generous sponsorship of Caframo for youth projects.


At 7PM Thursday September 13, in the auditorium of the public library, OSFN offers its first Indoor Meeting of the season, featuring acclaimed naturalist Bruce Mackenzie. Entitled “Wings Along A Cliff”, his presentation features the diversity of nesting birds and the plant ecology on the iconic cliff face at Bon Echo Provincial Park. Bruce will take us on a trip through time, and through the species living there at Bon Echo, as the cliff is constantly calling out to the curious naturalist.

Bruce Mackenzie (Supplied Photo).

Bruce Mackenzie (Supplied Photo).

Bon Echo Provincial Park (Photo by Bruce Mackenzie).

Bon Echo Provincial Park (Photo by Bruce Mackenzie).

Bon Echo Provincial Park (Photo by Bruce Mackenzie).

Bon Echo Provincial Park (Photo by Bruce Mackenzie).

Everyone is welcome to attend. Admission is free, although donations are welcome. It is also a good opportunity to purchase or renew your membership, ($25 single, $40 family, $15 student) or even to make a charitable donation to the various target areas for spending which include LEAF – local educational, and action, LBCF – Lorraine Brown Conservation Fund for nature reserves, and NN, NeighbourWoods North, enhancing urban forestry. Membership benefits also include the current club newsletter (the Hart’s Tongue Herald), and invitations to all field trips, and being on the mailing list for all announcements and updates. For your convenience, membership registration and renewal can also be done online, by visiting www.osfn.ca and clicking on the membership icon there, on the right side.

Also be sure to visit the Tom Thomson Art Gallery to see the current popular exhibition Trailblazers, which has been extended to November. One of the featured paintings which help to celebrate 125 years of Ontario Provincial Parks, is also entitled Bon Echo. Painted by Canadian artist Charles Comfort, it captures some of the majesty of this two kilometre long escarpment on the shores of Lake Mazinaw.

A reminder too that the superb nature exhibit Ice Age Mammals, now at Grey Roots will close September 16. See evidence that some of these wondrous animals lived and roamed right here in our own backyard.

To close, a nature quote from Anne Morrow Lindbergh – recommending that we maintain a “Closeness to nature to strengthen understanding and faith in the intermittency of life…”

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